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Celtic Wildflowers

SCROPHULARIACEAE

RED BARTSIA Odontites vernus

Red Bartsia is a native annual growing 15-40 cm in height and flowers from August into October. The small unobtrusive flowers belie how important this species is for bumble-bee conservation and it is a fundamental component of nearly all sites where the nationally scarce Shrill Carder Bee is now found.

Wildlife Value Rating
ProvenanceVC41 Glamorgan (Swansea, Neath Port Talbot) & VC44 Carmarthenshire
habitat in rough horse pasture, Kenfig Ind. Est. fields, Neath Port Talbot
attracting in a Shrill Carder Bee, Baglan Moors, Neath Port Talbot
habitat in rough horse pasture, Kenfig Ind. Est. fields, Neath Port Talbot
habitat on secondary dunes, Margam landfill site, Neath Port Talbot
Habitats and Growing AdviceAn annual root-hemiparasite of short, typically grazed, grasslands, tracks, road verges, pathways, brownfield sites and saltmarshes. Sometimes occurs in abundance on reseeded grass slopes. Succeeds in a variety of soils, where its semi-parasitic habit reveals associations with various species of grass, Red Clover and Plantains. The flowers are especially attractive to bumblebees and it is a key forage plant two BAP species; the Shrill Carder-bee and Brown-banded Carder-bee.
AssociationsThe 'Biological Records Centre’s' website lists the following numbers of foodplant associates for Red Bartsia: flies (1), sawflies, wasps and bees (1), and moths (2).
Stocklists for habitats